Conservationists target weed issues at Johns River Reserve and Hannam Vale Reserve

Hard working volunteers from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA). Photo: supplied.
Hard working volunteers from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA). Photo: supplied.

A group of conservationists have been working to eradicate invasive plants at Johns River Reserve and Hannam Vale Reserve.

The group, from Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) want to minimise the prevalence of camphor laurel trees and other unwanted lantana in the area through a variety of control methods.

Project team leader Elise Budden said the weed removal is for the benefit of native wildlife and the community. 

“It’s the habitat for gliders, possums and nesting birds,” Elise said.

“The forests are highly valued by the community.”

Camphor laurel has the ability to form single species communities which excludes native vegetation from growing.

The seeds of the tree are commonly dispersed after being ingested by birds.

Part of the work of volunteers will involve drilling trees before the application of herbicide. 

“After we drill, the herbicide is poured in. It will then slowly go into the roots.

“This is the safest way of doing it,” Elise said.

Removing weeds: Conservation Volunteers Australia's Tom Allan, John Way, Bob O'Mara, Denis Stanley, Dong Mo, Zheng Wenyue and Tony Mandarano. Photo: supplied.

Removing weeds: Conservation Volunteers Australia's Tom Allan, John Way, Bob O'Mara, Denis Stanley, Dong Mo, Zheng Wenyue and Tony Mandarano. Photo: supplied.

She added that only a small amount of weeds to be removed during the project are able to be hand pulled. 

Elise said CVA projects brings together local and international volunteers who are passionate about preserving the environment.

“It gives them a chance to see different Australian communities,” Elise said.

After you finish the work you really notice the difference.

Elise Budden, project manager

“It’s for people who love being outdoors and who want to restore the environment.”

This group includes Chinese volunteers Zheng Wenyue and Dong Mo. 

She added that volunteers are driven by seeing the final outcome of their work.

“After you finish the work you really notice the difference,” Elise said.

“It is really rewarding.”

The group experienced a very wet start to their work on Monday, July 2.

“We were out there in full wet weather gear,” Elise said. “We were very committed.”

The project ran until Friday, July 6. It was funded through Boral’s Connected Communities Program in partnership with CVA and support from Landcare. 

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