Deer collides with Liz Langdale's car on Ocean Drive, Lake Cathie

Head on deer collision: I was left shaken but unharmed from the incident on Thursday, June 20. Unfortunately my car has not recovered from the incident so well.
Head on deer collision: I was left shaken but unharmed from the incident on Thursday, June 20. Unfortunately my car has not recovered from the incident so well.

This morning I had an experience which I'm not keen to repeat anytime soon.

I was driving south through Lake Cathie on Ocean Drive just after 8am, when a deer came out of the area of land near Rainbow Beach Estate.

The brakes were slammed and the deer was hit head on, before it then rolled onto my bonnet.

In those fast -paced seconds I had a vivid moment where I pictured the deer's antlers smashing through my windscreen and piercing my skull. Something right out of a horror movie.

Fortunately that didn't happen and the deer, amazingly not hurt, hopped over to the other side of Ocean Drive.

I was left shaken but unharmed. Unfortunately my car has not recovered from the incident so well.

A very nice Lake Cathie resident witnessed the whole incident and was kind enough to stop his vehicle behind mine and check I was ok.

Another gentleman was riding his bike past and stopped to help me with my front bonnet to see if all the right car bits were still intact.

So grateful to have people like these men in our world.

There is signage warning motorists of deers along that particular section, however I had never seen a deer at the location prior to today's encounter.

The speed limit along that three kilometre stretch at Lake Cathie is 70km/h. However I will be taking the road a lot slower from now on.

 Out and about: Feral deer have been seen in urban areas of Port Macquarie.

Out and about: Feral deer have been seen in urban areas of Port Macquarie.

Deer collisions with motorists seem to becoming more frequent.

Port Macquarie-Hastings resident Mike Chambers collided with a deer on May 23 while travelling along Hastings River Drive.

There was another deer strike along Ocean Drive near Lake Cathie on May 30.

Mrs Williams said the increase in the population of feral red deer species has meant these animals are in disproportionate numbers in the electorate, causing tens of thousands of dollars in damage to personal possessions and properties and severe environmental impacts.

She said if the current population is left uncontrolled and unclassified the community could see further vehicle accidents and, sadly, the potential loss of life or severe injury.

Deer are not currently listed as a feral animal legally requiring control under the NSW Biosecurity Act 2015.

The Hastings Wild Deer Management Group has previously worked to have their status as a 'game animal' removed so control could be undertaken.

If collisions with cars keep rising, should more be done to address the issue?

For more information about deer management visit www.pmhc.nsw.gov.au

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