Lead William Tyrrell investigator Gary Jubelin charged over alleged illegal recordings

Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin will face four charges.
Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin will face four charges.

High-profile NSW homicide detective Gary Jubelin has been charged with four offences allegedly relating to illegal recordings made during the investigation into disappearance of missing boy William Tyrrell.

NSW Police on Friday, June 21 said Detective Chief Inspector Jubelin had been charged with four offences under the Surveillance Devices Act.

"Following a number of complaints, the Professional Standards Command commenced an investigation in 2018 overseen by the Law Enforcement Conduct Commission, into the conduct of the officer during the course of his operational duties," police said in a statement.

"Those inquiries disclosed a number of recordings allegedly made at locations in Parramatta and Kendall in New South Wales."

Chief Inspector Jubelin was issued with a court attendance notice and will appear in the Downing Centre Local Court on July 30.

"The officer's immediate employment status is under review however he has previously submitted his resignation to the Commissioner of Police," the police statement.

Det Ch Insp Gary Jubelin lead Strike Force Rosann - the squad charged with investigating the disappearance of William Tyrrell.

Det Ch Insp Gary Jubelin lead Strike Force Rosann - the squad charged with investigating the disappearance of William Tyrrell.

Chief Inspector Jubelin sensationally quit the police last month, after being stood down pending an internal investigation into alleged misconduct as he headed the high-profile investigation of William Tyrrell.

Chief Inspector Jubelin has been with the force since 1985, and has been involved in a number of high-profile investigations including the Bowraville murders, the brutal killing of Michelle Leng and the death of mentally ill Sydney woman Courtney Topic.

Chief Inspector Jubelin also worked on the murder of Sydney man Matthew Leveson, and led the team that found his body buried in the Royal National Park after a decade-long search.

His parents Faye and Mark Leveson threw their support behind the veteran officer earlier this year, when allegations against him were first aired.

"For Matty, he was nothing but professional, caring and compassionate. He puts his all into a case and that's what rubs people the wrong way ... It's very upsetting because he's worked so hard," said Faye.

  • This story first appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald