Port Macquarie-Hastings farmers rejoice as rain falls

Adorable: Three-year-old Ruby Cleary, granddaughter of Brombin dairy farmers Sue and Leo Cleary, enjoying the wetter conditions. Photo: supplied
Adorable: Three-year-old Ruby Cleary, granddaughter of Brombin dairy farmers Sue and Leo Cleary, enjoying the wetter conditions. Photo: supplied

It was the rain farmers thought might never come. But over the weekend the region copped a drenching.

Farmers say it is not enough to break the drought but it certainly helps.

Brombin dairy farmers Leo and Sue Cleary received a glorious 175mm.

"It will allow us to plant a crop (sorghum) for winter/autumn feed to make silage," Mrs Cleary said.

"Things were getting very tight and so this has given us a bit more long-term vision.

"Feed is still quite difficult to source and still very expensive."

Mrs Cleary said they still need a "good few inches in the next week or so" because the hot weather is not over.

"The ground is very, very dry," she said.

The Pappinbarra River is now flowing. Photo: Simon Os

The Pappinbarra River is now flowing. Photo: Simon Os

Long Flat farmer Chris Nelson described the 120mm of rain his farm received as "beautiful".

"It is definitely enough to start planting a crop," he enthused.

"It is way too wet to get on the ground now though, all the dams are still filling, there is runoff occurring.

"We haven't see these circumstances in a while."

But the amount of rain has caused problem for some farmers.

Vegetable farmers Rod and Desley Bailey at Upper Rollands Plains copped a whopping 200mm of rain.

"Although the rain was so desperately needed and the dam really needed filling, having so much rain all at once has also caused many of our crops such as lettuce, spring onions and zucchini to rot," Desley Bailey said.

"We don't complain because we know what the rain means to our neighbours who have been buying in feed for their dairy cows for months."

Lush: The dam at Rod and Desley Bailey's farm after the rain. Photo: supplied

Lush: The dam at Rod and Desley Bailey's farm after the rain. Photo: supplied

"As we look to the early part of this week, the main focus of the shower and storm activity is going to shift further inland on, and just west, of the ranges and further south in NSW," he said.