Flashback: A feature of Easter in Port Macquarie, the Carnival of the Pines to have some 40 floats - 1970

Spectacle: The 1970 traditional Easter Carnival of the Pines (photo from 1968 procession) will again have something for everyone.

Spectacle: The 1970 traditional Easter Carnival of the Pines (photo from 1968 procession) will again have something for everyone.

Variety for 16th Carnival

The 16th annual Carnival of the Pines, commencing on Good Friday night with an Easter Cantata at the Presbyterian Church, has something for everyone in the wide range of activities and entertainment scheduled across the weekend.

One of the highlights of the carnival will be the procession of floats through the town on Monday at 10am.

The procession will be the biggest yet seen, consisting of at least 40 floats as well as marching groups.

The six carnival queen candidates and the seven princesses will face intensive judging over the weekend.

The Carnival of the Pines Queen and Princess will be crowned in the Ritz Theatre on Tuesday night.

The judges will all be visitors and unknown to the contestants before the judging commences.

The well-known Easter Cantata Olivet to Calvary by J.H. Maunder will be presented in the Presbyterian Church, Port Macquarie on Good Friday, at 7.30pm.

The Carnival committee is appealing to any person with a convertible sports car.

The car is required to convey the visiting beauty queens in the procession.

Move for new Court House/Police Station

The Port Macquarie Municipal Council will make representations to the Department of Justice and the Police Department to expedite the provision of a new police station/court house.

The mover of the motion, Ald. Boardman, said it was not in the town's best interests for police here to endeavour to maintain law and order in their present premises.

The court house, he said, is an uncomfortable, dreadful place. He felt the old court house had no redeeming features.

He said people had difficulty in finding the police station and had to drive up a gravel lane to reach it.

Ald. Gott saw difficulties in dealing with two different government departments.

He felt council should ask the area's government representative to arrange a conference between council and the two departments.

He said he understood the National Trust was taking an interest in the old court house.

He felt the site of the present police station might be a suitable location for the complex.

Ald. Gott considered that a motor registry office, which he felt was needed in the town, might also be included in the building.

The motion was carried unanimously.

Port Macquarie Courthouse, 1963. Photos supplied by Port Macquarie Museum.

Port Macquarie Courthouse, 1963. Photos supplied by Port Macquarie Museum.

Council concerned at DMR sign

The Port Macquarie Municipal Council will ask the Department of Main Roads engineer to accept a deputation of aldermen and Gordon Street businessmen to discuss the re-locating of the directional sign in Hindman Street, near the intersection with Bridge Street West.

Council had received letters drawing their attention to the sign which was directing traffic directly down Bridge Street.

They felt the position was having a very serious effect on all classes of business in Gordon Street.

Ald. Boardman was concerned that traffic was pouring down a lightly constructed, narrow street through a residential area rather than down the heavily-constructed highway - Gordon Street - and thought the sign should come down immediately.

Ald. Adams felt council had seriously affected the livelihood of the Gordon Street businesses by constructing a median strip there. He thought they were surely due for every consideration.

This story Carnival floats on parade first appeared on Port Macquarie News.

Comments