Marine Rescue Camden Haven is preparing to modernise its disability access, storage and training facilities this year

BIG CHANGES
BIG CHANGES" Former unit commander Ken Rutledge with Marine Rescue Camden Haven unit commander Neville Adams.

Marine Rescue Camden Haven volunteers are preparing for a major overhaul in 2021 as the unit modernises its disability access, storage and training facilities.

The unit has officially shown off concept plans for a 15 metre long, seven metre wide shed extension and a lift providing disability access from the ground floor of the base in Laurieton.

Marine Rescue Camden Haven unit commander Neville Adams said the entire raft of changes could cost $650,000 including a proposed floating wharf to help rescue boats returning with injured people.

"There will be a disabled lift in the garage up to our second floor, there will be a disabled toilet on the same floor, a mezzanine floor will go across the existing boat shed and a new training room will be stored in there," he said.

"We have been talking about this for about 12 months. At the moment we have 54 members and if we want to have a meeting we have to hold it in the garage, to do that we have to move our Nissan X-Trail and small rescue boat out into the parking lot.

"We have two applications for funding in at the moment with the state government and our own head office. Whatever is left over we will try to make up the difference."

Mr Adams said the building radio room was last updated around two years ago and the new upgrades would be completed using local architects and builders.

BIG PLANS: Concept plans for a shed extension and a lift providing disability access

BIG PLANS: Concept plans for a shed extension and a lift providing disability access

Former unit commander Ken Rutledge said a disability friendly bathroom and lift access would allow more members of the public to join the unit.

"We have had people with disabilities come in and want to join. Previously we couldn't get them into the radio facilities (because it's upstairs) and this update would allow us to do that," he said.

"New buildings must have disability access but this building has been here for around 35 years. It is vitally necessary and would also help most of our members who are seniors."

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