Sticky situation for little microbats prompts warning from FAWNA

FAWNA is urging Mid North Coast residents to avoid using sticky fly paper outdoors after treating several glue-entrapped microbats for injuries.
FAWNA is urging Mid North Coast residents to avoid using sticky fly paper outdoors after treating several glue-entrapped microbats for injuries.

FAWNA is urging Mid North Coast residents to avoid using sticky fly paper outdoors after treating several glue-entrapped microbats for injuries.

Microbats are some of the smallest animals treated by the local wildlife rescue group. They catch insects on the wing and can be seen at nightfall darting around catching their prey by echolocation.

Microbats are effective natural insect pest controllers, cleaning up mozzies and other insect pests at night.

FAWNA is urging Mid North Coast residents to avoid using sticky fly paper outdoors after treating several glue-entrapped microbats for injuries.

FAWNA is urging Mid North Coast residents to avoid using sticky fly paper outdoors after treating several glue-entrapped microbats for injuries.

FAWNA treated on 42gm mircobat in December. It has been caught in sticky fly paper by its torso, wings and ears.

FAWNA's central flying-fox and bat co-ordinator, Meredith Ryan, urges everyone to ensure they follow instructions on all pest control items.

"Misused they all cause enormous harm to our wildlife and tiny creatures. This microbat may take quite some time to recover from the harmful chemicals in the sticky fly paper and the stress of treatment."

The resident who called FAWNA was devastated that her actions had harmed the creature which has the capacity to eat thousands of insects every night.

Just two months after the first incident, two more long-eared microbats were caught up in sticky fly paper used outdoors.

Residents are urged to read and follow the instructions on all pest control devices before putting them to use.

FAWNA carers Jane and Susanne will work to ensure the microbats are completely free from the sticky residue on the flypaper before being released. They will be sustained on a diet of mealworms and insects.

Report wildlife incidents to the FAWNA wildlife rescue hotline on 6581 4141.

The public should not handle bats or flying-foxes but wait for a FAWNA rescuer who is vaccinated against the Australian Bat Lyssavirus.