Original Wiggles member Greg Page discusses Sudden Cardiac Arrest and the importance of automated external defibrillators

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER: Former yellow Wiggle Greg Page. Photo: AMY McINTYRE
KNOWLEDGE IS POWER: Former yellow Wiggle Greg Page. Photo: AMY McINTYRE

Lights were shining and music rockin' as original Wiggles member Greg Page entertained at a bushfire relief concert in Sydney on January 17.

Mr Page was feeling slightly unwell as the performance was ending, but reassured himself that it was simply the blood-pumping finale.

In that moment, he was completely unaware the exact opposite situation was happening in his body. He suffered a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and dropped to the stage at Castle Hill RSL.

Bystanders immediately began delivering CPR and an automated external defibrillator (AED) was used. It saved his life.

Mr Page would later discover he'd had a complete obstruction of blood flow caused by undiagnosed heart disease.

The original Yellow Wiggle has since recovered and is sharing his story, promoting awareness about SCA and the importance of AEDs.

Heart Health NSW is co-ordinating a series of talks about the benefits of knowing CPR and the use of AEDs with Laurieton United Services Club, Kendall Ex Services Club, Port City Bowling Club, Kempsey Pensioners and Wauchope Country Club.

"Having a SCA was something that I'd never expected to happen. I considered myself quite healthy, fit, I was doing competition tennis and cricket," he said.

Yellow Wiggle, Greg Page, recovering after heart surgery, following an on-stage collapse.

Yellow Wiggle, Greg Page, recovering after heart surgery, following an on-stage collapse.

"Unfortunately I didn't know that I had heart disease and that led to a massive heart attack without any warning. There was no pain, I felt a little unwell but I was also physically exerting myself in the performance.

"Luckily people around me recognised it as a sudden cardiac arrest, people knew CPR and there was an AED at the venue which meant I had all three vital links in the chain of survival. I was one of the 10 per cent of people who survived a cardiac arrest in Australia.

"Unfortunately AEDs and CPR training isn't widely enough available and that is why we are still only at that 10 per cent survival rate.

"Only 40 per cent of Australians suffering sudden cardiac arrest will receive CPR before the ambulance arrives and only two per cent will receive AED intervention, which is very low.

"We need people to have a go at CPR and have a try of using an AED because cardiac arrest can strike anyone at anytime."

Mr Page will be speaking on Monday, March 29 at Laurieton United Services Club from 10am, Kendall Ex Services Club from 2.30pm and Port City Bowling Club from 6pm.

He will also be visiting Kempsey Pensioners Hall from 10am and Wauchope Country Club from 2pm on Tuesday, March 30.

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