Hastings Old Holdens parade through Port Macquarie to mark the end of Australian production

The last leg: Mick Brownlow's and his mighty Torana SL/R 5000. The Hastings Old Holdens Club will salute the end of the line for Holden production in Australia.
The last leg: Mick Brownlow's and his mighty Torana SL/R 5000. The Hastings Old Holdens Club will salute the end of the line for Holden production in Australia.

Historic cars from the Hastings Old Holdens Car Club will parade through Port Macquarie’s CBD on Sunday, October 15 as a salute to the final car rolling off the Australian production line.

Club members will assemble at the Food For Less carpark in Short Street from 9am before parading down Horton Street at 9.30am.

The cavalcade will then proceed to the Camden Haven Show.

Members of the public are invited to come along and view these Aussie icons as they rumble down the street and through the suburbs on the way to Kendall.

The event is being held to mark the end of car manufacturing in Australia, scheduled when the last Holden Commodore is due to roll off the production line on Friday, October 20, 2017.

The Hastings Old Holdens event will coincide with a major parade organised by GMH in Adelaide on the same day.

“Our members, and I’m sure many members of the public, will be sad to see the demise of Australian cars built by Australians, for Australians, especially for Australian conditions,” said Mick Brownlow, secretary of Hastings Old Holdens.

“Holden cars built in Australia are truly Aussie icons and their disappearance will leave this country a poorer place in many respects.

“Since 1948 when GMH produced the first Holden, commonly known as the FX, hundreds of thousands of Australians have been employed in well paying jobs, not only in the car plants but also in the component manufacturers and distribution outlets.

Holdens, and other well-known Aussie cars have become synonymous with the lifestyle and aspirations of generations of Australians. Indeed, many Australians were conceived in the back seat of a Holden.

Mick Brownlow, secretary of Hastings Old Holdens

“The car industry has brought prosperity to many Aussie families and communities as well as building the national skills base since 1948.

“Holdens, and other well-known Aussie cars have become synonymous with the lifestyle and aspirations of generations of Australians. Indeed, many Australians were conceived in the back seat of a Holden.”

Wayne Webber, president of Hastings Old Holdens said club members are concerned for the thousands of Australians who will lose their jobs, or have already lost their jobs, as a result of the closure of Ford, Toyota and Holden manufacturing in Australia over the last year.

“It is disturbing that after a year since the Ford factory closed, half of the displaced Ford workers are yet to find full time employment,” Mr Webber said.

“We wish all displaced automotive workers, their families and communities well in these current difficult times.

“The demise of Australian car manufacturing is an indictment of the failure of successive federal governments’ reliance on discredited free market economics as well as decisions taken in overseas boardrooms that haven’t been in the interest Australians.”