Sean Gleeson talks about his prostate cancer diagnosis

Sean said it was a big shock when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2011. He kept it as a secret from his wider circle of friends up until recently.

Sean said it was a big shock when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2011. He kept it as a secret from his wider circle of friends up until recently.

Sean Gleeson wants to encourage all men to see their doctor for regular checks.

The Camden Haven Show Society president was diagnosed with prostate cancer a few years ago when he was 41-years-old.

Sean had originally sought medical treatment for a knee injury and during the check up his doctor encouraged him to undergo a blood test.

The test returned with a high level for prostate specific antigen (PSA).

Sean was referred to a specialist who continued to monitor his levels through blood testing. After three years Sean's PSA was still high so he underwent an MRI and a biopsy which determined he had cancer.

Sean said it was a big shock when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer.

"It knocked me for a six," he said.

Sean has had three biopsys since his diagnosis in 2011.

After a recent biopsy his urologist told Sean while the cancer hadn't gone away, it hasn't progressed and isn't aggressive.

Sean has to undergo regular blood tests every six months to monitor his PSA levels.

Recently Sean decided to tell his wider circle of friends after keeping his diagnosis to himself.

Since Sean posted on social media, he has already had a conversation with a man and urged him to see his doctor for a blood test.

"I think a lot of men, like myself, think they are bullet proof because we're fit, healthy and strong," he said.

Sean said he is open to talking to men about his journey in a bid to help others.

Dr Nader Awad is a urologist in Port Macquarie who said a PSA blood test is a simple test that could indicate an underlying problem.

"It is important to remember though, that having an elevated PSA does not necessarily mean that prostate cancer is present," he said.

"There are many other causes of an elevated PSA."

Dr Awad said a new imaging test, called a multiparametric MRI, can help differentiate between men who need to consider a biopsy and those who don't.

"It has been a major advance in the area of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment," he said.

For more information about prostate cancer or for symptoms visit www.cancercouncil.com.au/prostate-cancer

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